P2P: May 2005 Archives

And so House decided to do interesting things. To be honest I preferred the jumpy pumpy to the revelation, but who would have guessed, eh? I can't say it's the most innovative way of presentation, but it was okay - unfortunately still referential, but then most things are. It's always more fun to play than to play for a reason, though playing for a reason in roundy circles without saying uncle is as good a way as any. Is playing for playing another kind of roundy circle? I've not thankfully made myself lose all interest and find it all tedious.

And so they picked up on the odd ambivalence of Sela Ward's empathy. Are her eyebrows really like that? And so it occurs to me that as with so many times, I probably liked or thought I liked more than came out and chiseled.

I recommend for convenience the TorrentSpy.com directory. For House.

Who's a clever monkey? The wonderful tutorial is here. The source/files are here. Not even as difficult as installing say Movable Type, though I did get a number of things messed up. The database stuff was pretty confusing, since my ISP sets things up so that things are much simpler than they represent.

But yes, voila, biffing.fallingbeam.org. Currently the only thing I'm seeding is Dion's Nikon Booth Babes, but all are welcome to it. It's a registration only tracker, so deal with it. For this, I only provide telephone support, my typing can't handle it otherwise - but it's simple, just sign up and things should just work out.

Both are now available online, so check out Murder One at Realworld starting with the pilot, and Igby Goes Down at ShareProvider. It's just because I love these both so much - I actually have them on DVD. I actually did a previous post on Igby, if you can be bothered to search for it.

I wrote about the GWA in a previous post, one that seemed rather popular with the Opera users in the forums. Hence an update.

Apparently their "web accelerator" might be doing something as simple as exploiting your isp's local cache. When I browse using it, my IP gets redirected to a different IP, identified as cache.myisp etc. Which makes me wonder first who's doing most of the work, whether my ISP should be offering this rather than Google etc. But I suppose ISPs are looking to minimise support issues as much as possible yes/no? And they probably don't mind people being efficient and using their cache. Still, it seems to take the mystique out of google's little miracle app.

Well, what this means is that if you belong to any registration based BT site, you're going to want to turn GWA off for those sites. Because if you don't you might not be able to down/upload, and your stats might not get counted - basically you'll be registering the site with a different IP than your BT client. You turn GWA off for those sites by going to the settings menu - right click on the system tray icon, under preferences. It'll launch the local web page with your settings in it, and you should add in the domains that you want to exclude, eg: .filelist.org, .uknova.com. Simple enough, but took me a bit to realise. That preferences menu is also quite useful to twiddling the settings of the app.

Adding the urls to the bypass list in Proxo isn't the way to go apparently, since that didn't make a difference (obvious to some, probably, but not to me). I'm assuming passing Azureus through the proxy would be ill-advised. If only because it'd clog up the traffic through the cache, and I think the cache is clever enough to stop that - well at least it was with the Uni network back in the old country.

Oh, and I find out that it makes a hash of handling me going to my admin panel on my forums, so that's out as well.

I suppose that's one of the questions I would have asked Tetchy: how he feels about the people out there who undoubtedly feel that Opera is worth pirating, and well, that it needs pirating. So yes, he's right, it is free.

In many ways I think that nowadays, in terms of a piece of software getting noticed or popularised, being well placed on a BT site, say TorrentSpy or ISOHunt, would be about as prestigious/useful as being featured on Download.com used to be. What disappoints me is that it doesn't seem as popular as you'd think, with not that many seeders, and even fewer leechers. Though I suppose being so tiny, that most people don't feel the need to stay too long.

Obviously these are people who either find it convenient, or don't know what astalavista is. By the way, Opera's keygen-ed serials seem to last forever (I'm told), unlike other applications (Nero for example) who blacklist serials in every other release. I think the last time they did it was when 6 turned into 7 (allegedly).

As far as my interest in this goes, as long as they're using Opera I don't see a problem, they're still upping the market share and telling their friends. I know friends who have been turned on to Opera by getting it off P2p, and friends who are annoyed by the ads (which is most of them), somehow find a way towards getting an extended trial period. Funny how that works. I wonder if the Mozzarella Foundation gets revenue from the Google searches from FF.

I'm still blown away that BT sites are linked to on Wikipedia.

As to how this fits in with me talking about Opera in an economic sense, that's a longer conversation.

Apparently someone seems to be out to sabotage people who want to download Deadwood via Bittorrent. I've had a number of torrents going for days trying to get it, and it seems stuck at a particular percentage, even though there are supposed to be seeds. Of course this might just be me or the new version of Azureus, but I doubt it.

The solution for me was very simple. ed2k. so here you go, RealWorld is still tops. I respect that The Man is getting wise to the fact that frustration is their friend and that roadblocks/humps are more effective than you'd think, but they really need to get a fucking clue.





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This page is a archive of entries in the P2P category from May 2005.

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